The Male Breast  Cancer Blog

by HIS Breast Cancer Awareness

Douglas Harper had no idea that men could get breast cancer. Until he was diagnosed with it aged 49. Here he candidly describes his experience.

Douglas Harper 54, from London. He's a father of five who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 aged 49, three days before his 50th birthday. He had no idea that men could get breast cancer, and neither did his partner, family or friends. And we imagine you didn't either. Here's what you need to know to protect yourself and the men in your life:

It star...

I am 55-year-old white male married 35 years with 2 children and 2 grandchildren. One day in September 2019, I was in the shower shaving and felt something on my left breast right below my areola.

When I got out, I asked my wife to feel this and give me her opinion. After she felt it, she said I had a lump and need to go to my doctor. I made an appointment and went to visit him for a check which he said probably just a lipoma or fat deposit and said he would order an ultrasound. I left his office...

Five years ago, a tumor was discovered in the duct of my left nipple. The tumor stimulated the nipple duct to lactate and then discharge blood. Classified as benign, it was removed by a breast specialist in Brooklyn, NY.

I work as a musician and high school teacher. Recently, after doing errands and chores, I felt a sharp pain in the area of the nipple incision. The pain was followed by swelling and lasted a few days. At first I thought that I might have pulled something by lifting. The swelling...

October 21, 2019

My name is Thomas T.  and I'm a 45 year old man with breast cancer.

A few months ago I was diagnosed with male breast cancer. I have been Married for 20 years. I  have two children both boys ages 20 and 17. I had genetic testing done to make sure that we were being proactive. I wanted to make sure that my children had all the knowledge that I could give them by completing any testing that I could have done. 

My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer when she was 35 years old, ended up with ovaria...

Alternative Treatment Proves to be Less Harmful to Breast Cancer Patients

Breast cancer impacts the lives of many women, men, and their families across the country. In fact, the National Breast Cancer Foundation says that by the end of 2017, 246,660 women and 2,600 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, but some pose a higher risk than others. In order to decide which treatment is best for a patient's breast cancer, where their cancer is loca...

If you have been diagnosed with breast cancer, your ability to earn a living may be adversely affected, forcing you to take time off or resign completely. To compound the stress, most breast cancer treatments, such as radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery, are expensive without health insurance, which you may lose access to if you can’t work. Fortunately, the Social Security Administration (SSA) pays monthly cash benefits and enables access to Medicare or Medicaid for women and men debilitated by...

A cancer diagnosis is cruel at anytime, but it is especially difficult during the holidays. A time that is supposed to be spent with family in a warm home surrounded by enough food to feed a stadium is turned into long days in the hospital being poked by doctors and nurses, not knowing what the future holds.

This was the case for Heather Von St. James, an 11-year mesothelioma survivor. She was diagnosed with malignant pleural mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer that affects the lining of the lungs...

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