The Male Breast  Cancer Blog

by HIS Breast Cancer Awareness

September 2, 2020

Breast cancer in males is a rare occurrence: less than 1% of all breast cancer cases occur in men. For men, the lifetime risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer is about 1 in 833. However, just because it is rare doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist, and learning the facts and statistics about this condition can save lives.

Breast cancer may be considered by most as a female-only disease: after all, men don’t have breasts, right? Well, the truth is, all humans have breast tissue. The hormones in a wo...

Social Security: Options Of Social Security Disability For People With Cancer

Cancer seems to be one of the scariest things to have, more so when it hampers the diseased employment and working ability. Patients fighting cancer can't be put to work, can they? Is it possible for them to get some kind of financial support from the government while they fight this ailment? For most, cancer is a terminal illness. Is it possible that these people live the last bit of their life without grieving and suf...

 How Good Nutrition Can Support Your Breast Cancer Treatment

When undergoing breast cancer treatment, ensuring that your body is well equipped to fight and handle the side-effects of treatment is essential. An individualized nutrition plan can be particularly helpful in supporting and complementing your breast cancer treatment plan. Of particular importance to this is developing a clear understanding of the food types which can offer the most benefit.

The Benefits Of A Healthy Diet

Eating the corre...

10 Ways to Show a Terminal Family Member That They Are Not a Burden

According to research, as many 65% of people who are terminally ill feel that they're a burden to others, and those feelings can add to their suffering. When caring for terminal patients it’s important to see to more than their physical needs. You also should consider their emotional needs and offer assurance they are not a burden.

Showing a terminal family member that they are loved and appreciated rather than an encumberment is...

Douglas Harper had no idea that men could get breast cancer. Until he was diagnosed with it aged 49. Here he candidly describes his experience.

Douglas Harper 54, from London. He's a father of five who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 aged 49, three days before his 50th birthday. He had no idea that men could get breast cancer, and neither did his partner, family or friends. And we imagine you didn't either. Here's what you need to know to protect yourself and the men in your life:

It star...

Do the men in your life know they can be diagnosed with breast cancer? Do men realize they have breast too?

On Father’s Day you’re probably thinking about the family of men in your life. In addition to your father or father in law or husband, you probably send wishes to sons, brothers, uncles, friends and neighbors. This Father’s Day would be a great opportunity to help make them all aware that breast cancer is not just a woman’s disease.

With conversations today about pandemics, race, equality, t...

I am 55-year-old white male married 35 years with 2 children and 2 grandchildren. One day in September 2019, I was in the shower shaving and felt something on my left breast right below my areola.

When I got out, I asked my wife to feel this and give me her opinion. After she felt it, she said I had a lump and need to go to my doctor. I made an appointment and went to visit him for a check which he said probably just a lipoma or fat deposit and said he would order an ultrasound. I left his office...

Five years ago, a tumor was discovered in the duct of my left nipple. The tumor stimulated the nipple duct to lactate and then discharge blood. Classified as benign, it was removed by a breast specialist in Brooklyn, NY.

I work as a musician and high school teacher. Recently, after doing errands and chores, I felt a sharp pain in the area of the nipple incision. The pain was followed by swelling and lasted a few days. At first I thought that I might have pulled something by lifting. The swelling...

Surviving breast cancer definitely isn’t easy but being a survivor during Covid-19 makes everything even more challenging! As a man, you’re probably used to feeling strong and able to conquer most anything but after being diagnosed with male breast cancer, you may have to work a little harder to regain that strength.

HIS Breast Cancer wants to assist with giving away FREE year long memberships to Grokker and providing a few tips for your daily exercise routine. Grokker shares on-line health and...

At the beginning of the most recent coronavirus outbreak, most of the population assumed this was a new virus that no one has ever dealt with before. While COVID-19 is a new strain, coronavirus is not a new virus. The good news is that scientists and doctors know more about this pandemic than originally thought. The hard part has been stopping the spread and caring for the severely ill patients fighting the disease.


Another thing to keep in mind is that out of the three most recent strains of co...

April 17, 2020

According to the US National Cancer Institute, cancer mortality is higher among men with a rate of 196.8 per 100,000 compared to 139.6 among women. With the rising awareness about the disease and men’s susceptibility to it, they are also exerting their effort to cancer prevention. It includes having annual checkups, maintaining a healthy body and shifting to anti-cancer diets.They are also checking on their daily routines and making adjustments just in case there are some activities that ex...

March 19, 2020

Since the 1970s, male breast cancer cases have risen from 0.86 cases per 100,000 men to 1.2. Deaths relating to air pollution are rising too. Vox reports that there were almost 10,000 more deaths caused by air pollution in 2018 than there were in 2016. This, therefore, highlights the serious impact that air pollution has on the nation’s health. But most importantly, it begs the question: is air pollution contributing to the growing number of males being diagnosed with breast cancer?

Is outdoor ai...

Having, recovering or being at risk for cancer is scary enough, now add COVID-19

During this challenging time with the Coronavirus, it’s important to continue to keep your mind and body strong during this time of social isolation, a loss of routine and increased anxiety. HIS Breast Cancer Awareness and Grokker are able to provide you with this FREE link to access thousands of on line holistic wellbeing programs and videos-including fitness, mental health, yoga, nutrition, sleep and financial well...

As a cancer survivor, do we live in fear of a virus too? As a survivor there are the constant thoughts and worries about recurrence or worse, metastasis. As a BRCA mutation carrier (or any hereditary genetic mutation), there are days of fear with a greater risk of a new diagnosis. These bring a challenge to every minute, hour and days of our life.  How does this compare to the fears of the Coronavirus? 

While flying home from vacation with my brother Harvey and our spouses, a trip we enjoy t...

December 17, 2019

When people talk about terminal cancer, there is one thing you usually don’t hear about – the financial burden. A terminal cancer diagnosis is surrounded by emotions and sadness; the last thing you probably want to think about is how to handle the financial considerations that come along with this diagnosis. However, ignoring the financial implications and avoiding the topic will not make the situation better, and can actually lead to more negative emotions down the line. No one wants to be hand...

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